entrepreneurship https://greatvalley.psu.edu/ en Local entrepreneur aims to improve bicycle safety https://greatvalley.psu.edu/story/5926/2020/02/13/local-entrepreneur-aims-improve-bicycle-safety <span>Local entrepreneur aims to improve bicycle safety</span> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Thu, 02/13/2020 - 15:50</span> <span class="post-date">2020-02-13T12:48:00GMT</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MALVERN, Pa. — One summer day in 2017 after finishing a bike ride, Glenmoore, Pennsylvania, resident Doug Thompson got home and began reading the latest issue of <a href="https://www.bicycling.com/">Bicycling</a>. The magazine laid out a harsh reality: 50,000 bicycling accidents and 1,800 fatalities per year in the United States. Most cyclists hit by cars were struck from behind, never seeing what was coming. The numbers were much higher than what Thompson, an avid cyclist, would have expected.</p> <p>Another statistic jumped out at Thompson, too: If cyclists were to add lights to their bicycles, it would significantly reduce their chances of getting hit, even during the day. Thompson inspected the rear light on his bike — small and nested on the seat post. Most other bicycle models had similar light placement. Yes, the rear lights helped increase visibility, but could more be done?</p> <p>Then, it hit Thompson: Three lights.</p> <p>“When you approach the rear of a car, there are two taillights and then the center light. It gives you depth perception and it also gets your attention,” Thompson said. “I started sketching … [and] I got to this point where I started looking at the seat post and the seat rails. It hit me that no one was doing lights that attached to the seat rails and came out from behind the rider, bringing the lights closer to the car.”</p> <p>After a trip to a local craft store, Thompson cut pieces of foam core and glued them together to create an initial model of "The TailWin!" which he attached to the back of his bike and tested. One of Thompson’s entrepreneur friends referred him to a designer in Colorado, who 3D printed a prototype.</p> <p>Thompson pitched The TailWin! at the West Chester University Business Idea Competition earlier in the year and was eager to continue sharing and promoting his idea. When he learned about Penn State Great Valley’s <a href="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/rev-up-center-for-entrepreneurship/lion-cage">Lion Cage pitch competition</a> through the <a href="https://ccedcpa.com/industry-partner/i2n/">Ideas x Innovation Network</a> (i2n), he jumped at the opportunity.</p> <p>Lion Cage is held through Penn State Great Valley’s <a href="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/rev-up-center-for-entrepreneurship">REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship</a>, which offered participants the opportunity to practice their pitch and receive feedback from Leo Daito, REV-UP entrepreneur-in-residence, prior to the event.</p> <p>“I got some really good insights from Leo during my prep,” Thompson said. “I listened to his feedback and I made adjustments and it really worked well for me during the actual presentation.”</p> <p>Each presenter has five minutes to pitch their idea, followed by a question-and-answer session with the panel of judges. Thompson gets energized from public speaking, and the Warren V. Musser Auditorium in which the event was held — an amphitheater-style room that seats 400 — was the perfect venue.</p> <p>“I love when we got to the Q&A round because I feel like if I’m getting questions, there’s interest, and if I’m getting questions, people paid attention to the presentation,” Thompson said. “I loved talking to some of the judges afterwards, getting to know what was important, what stood out to them, what they would work on if they could change something.”</p> <p>Thompson was thrilled when he won second place.</p> <div data-embed-button="node" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:node.embed" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="a342462b-1a7f-46d2-94cc-d1a9b987a164" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"><div role="article" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/photo/5381/2019/11/22/doug-thompson-and-doug-schumer" class="node image node-image embed clearfix"> <div class="content entity-embed"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/sites/greatvalley/files/styles/node_embed/public/DSC_8386.jpg?itok=rq5Ii0w5" width="700" height="467" alt="Doug Schumer presenting Doug Thompson with his award" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></div> <div class="group-info field-group-div"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Doug Schumer presents Doug Thompson with his second-place award, at Penn State Great Valley's third annual Lion Cage pitch competition on Nov. 16, 2019.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-credit field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Image: Christy Selagy</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="drupal-embed" embed_type="node" nid="5381" view_mode="embedded"></div> <p>After Lion Cage, Thompson posted about his experience and The TailWin! on his LinkedIn page. As the word spread through his network, a friend introduced Thompson to local marketing experts who have proprietary technology that can further advance The TailWin! and increase cyclists’ visibility to drivers.</p> <p>Ideally, Thompson said, he would like to reach a licensing agreement with a major bike company so The TailWin! can be widely available for consumers. He said he also envisions potentially starting a crowdsourcing campaign so potential buyers can pledge to purchase The TailWin! without the need for mass production.</p> <p>Regardless of how the product is produced, Thompson sees a bright future for The TailWin!, especially given the rapid growth rate of bicycle traffic in the Greater Philadelphia region.</p> <p>“This product was never money-motivated,” Thompson said. “What’s more important for me is to see it in production, to see people have these bike lights on their bikes and not get hit by cars and not be injured.”</p> <p>For more information, contact Thompson at <a href="mailto:thetailwin@gmail.com">thetailwin@gmail.com</a>.</p> </div> Thu, 13 Feb 2020 20:50:54 +0000 admin 5926 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Local entrepreneur brings birds' sounds inside through passion project https://greatvalley.psu.edu/story/4856/2019/09/27/local-entrepreneur-brings-birds-sounds-inside-through-passion-project <span>Local entrepreneur brings birds' sounds inside through passion project</span> <div class="field field--name-field-subtitle field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Penn State Great Valley’s REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship provides support, guidance to aspiring entrepreneurs</div> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Fri, 09/27/2019 - 14:55</span> <span class="post-date">2019-09-27T16:13:00GMT</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MALVERN, Pa. — More than a decade ago, Bloomsburg University graduate Wayne Frick was struck with an idea for an invention, an idea that always lingered in his mind. He enjoyed listening to the sound of birds at his birdfeeders, but as the weather got colder, he couldn’t have the windows open. It would be great to be able to hear the birds from inside, he thought.</p> <p>There was nothing on the market that quite fit the bill, though; wired speakers were too cumbersome, and, at that point, wireless technology was unreliable. Frick had to put the idea on hold, but the seed for <a href="http://chirpsounds.com/">Chirpsounds</a> had been planted.</p> <p>As technology progressed, creating a product that would transmit the sounds of birds to a receiver seemed more feasible. Bluetooth technology developed a longer range. Frick learned about lithium ion batteries, which could withstand the cold much better than traditional alkaline batteries could.</p> <p>The pieces were coming together, but Frick needed help solidifying his vision. He reached out to the <a href="https://www.score.org/">U.S. Small Business Administration’s SCORE program</a>, a network of volunteers who help mentor prospective entrepreneurs.</p> <p>“I met with a couple of those guys and told them my idea, and they could see very clearly that I was all over the place,” Frick said. “I hadn’t really determined what this thing was going to be. I was just all possibilities and no specifics.”</p> <p>As the SCORE members helped Frick refine his idea, they mentioned a new program that might be of interest: <a href="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/rev-up-center-for-entrepreneurship">Penn State Great Valley’s REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship</a>.</p> <p>SCORE facilitated Frick’s first meeting with REV-UP, and, as he began to work with REV-UP, his vision for Chirpsounds became clearer. One of his biggest sources of support was Leo Daiuto, REV-UP’s entrepreneur-in-residence, who helped Frick develop some of the more technical aspects of Chirpsounds.</p> <p>Frick graduated from Bloomsburg University with a degree in biology — the design and engineering areas weren’t familiar to him, so he needed to learn new skillsets to keep up with his product.</p> <p>“Leo has been a great resource because he’s been there,” Frick said. “He’s made electronic products before, so he understands the process. He understands what I’m going through. Although he may not have been involved in some of the engineering decisions, he’s seen the whole process. He helped me get clarity and guided my thinking in a lot of areas.”</p> <p>Frick had been involved with REV-UP for a while when Daiuto encouraged Frick to participate in <a href="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/rev-up-center-for-entrepreneurship/lion-cage">Lion Cage</a>, Penn State Great Valley’s annual entrepreneurial pitch competition. The "Shark Tank"-style event has participants present their ideas to a panel of judges, who then ask questions and provide feedback. The top three finalists receive cash prizes.</p> <p>There was one problem, though: The Lion Cage pitch is limited to five minutes. Chirpsounds was a dozen years in the making. How could that be boiled down to such a short time?</p> <p>“I can’t even tell you what a painful process that was,” Frick said. “I probably spent the better part of two weeks [working on it]. … At the end, I practiced, and practiced, and practiced, and I got it down to about three and a half minutes. It ended up being just about almost five, anyway. All of that practice and all of that mental exercise, trying to refine it and figure out what the most important parts were, that was really, really helpful for me.”</p> <p>Although he had to make tough decisions about what to include in his Lion Cage pitch, Frick’s work paid off. He came in third and earned his first revenue for Chirpsounds.</p> <p>Since Lion Cage, Chirpsounds has made some key strides. REV-UP 3D-printed a sanded and stained prototype, a transmitter that is shaped and colored like an acorn. In May, Frick and his wife, Diane, who live in Lederach, Pennsylvania, hosted a table at "The Biggest Week in American Birding," a birding festival held in northwest Ohio, showing off the product to the public for the first time. A retail store told Frick they’d like to consider carrying Chirpsounds.</p> <div data-embed-button="node" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:node.embed" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="bbdc6013-991a-40af-b04e-7740e17d7154" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"><div role="article" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/photo/4846/2019/09/27/chirpsounds-prototype" class="node image node-image embed clearfix"> <div class="content entity-embed"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/sites/greatvalley/files/styles/node_embed/public/20190430_093801_1.jpg?itok=d-03eRnk" width="700" height="394" alt="Sanded and stained prototype of Chirpsounds" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></div> <div class="group-info field-group-div"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The sanded and stained prototype of <a href="http://chirpsounds.com/">Chirpsounds</a>.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-credit field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Image: Wayne Frick</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="drupal-embed" embed_type="node" nid="4846" view_mode="embedded"></div> <p>Frick doesn’t have a launch date set, but Chirpsounds is close to becoming a reality, thanks to support from friends and family. REV-UP has provided invaluable help with numerous aspects.</p> <p>“It’s really been Leo’s help. I have to say that he’s been more helpful to me than any other single source,” Frick said. “His help to me has been mostly guidance. I can shoot him messages and get specific answers to things. … One of the things that we’re probably going to do next is actually have a strategy brainstorming session where we determine what are the things that still need to happen from a business perspective and a manufacturing perspective.”</p> </div> Fri, 27 Sep 2019 18:55:17 +0000 admin 4856 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu 2019 Summer Founders Program Logo https://greatvalley.psu.edu/photo/3436/2019/01/24/2019-summer-founders-program-logo <span>2019 Summer Founders Program Logo</span> <div class="field field--name-field-credit field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Image: Penn State</div> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/sites/greatvalley/files/styles/photo_gallery_large/public/SFP-2019-555x212.jpg?itok=zmfXmil3" width="555" height="212" alt="2019 Summer Founders Program Logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></div> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/24/2019 - 11:45</span> Thu, 24 Jan 2019 16:45:30 +0000 admin 3436 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Great Valley study on the effectiveness of entrepreneurial teams earns honors https://greatvalley.psu.edu/story/2744/2018/10/09/great-valley-study-effectiveness-entrepreneurial-teams-earns-honors <span>Great Valley study on the effectiveness of entrepreneurial teams earns honors</span> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Tue, 10/09/2018 - 10:04</span> <span class="post-date">2018-10-09T13:27:00GMT</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div> <p>MALVERN, Pa. — To launch a fruitful business or product, entrepreneurs must rely on a team of people to effectively integrate individual skills and communicate in a productive way. But even with good teams in place, some groups are better set up for success than others.</p> <p>As part of an <a href="https://news.psu.edu/story/467472/2017/05/09/jablokow-awarded-nsf-grant-study-optimal-design-team-performance" target="_blank">ongoing grant from the National Science Foundation</a> (NSF), Kathryn Jablokow, professor of engineering design and mechanical engineering at Penn State Great Valley, is examining how engineering teams work together to design and deliver products — and what ultimately renders some teams more effective.</p> <p>But recently Jablokow — alongside Mohamed Megahed and Pratik Pachpute, two Great Valley graduate students — extended the work to specifically focus on the interaction dynamics of entrepreneurs.</p> <p>Partnering with Neeraj Sonalkar, a research engineer at Stanford University; Ilya Avdeev, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; and Brian Thompson,the president of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Research Foundation and director of the Lubar Entrepreneurship Center, the group studied five NSF Innovation Corps (I-Corps) teams in a program that helps prepare scientists and engineers to commercialize NSF-funded projects. Consisting of three primary members — an academic lead, an entrepreneurial lead, and an I-Corps mentor — each I-Corps team was tasked to determine whether to launch their startup.</p> <p>Led by Penn State and Stanford, the I-Corps teams participated in a group effectiveness workshop in March 2017 at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. While their entrepreneurial projects were diverse — ranging from a robotic consumer venture to a nursing product to improve patient safety in intensive care units — each team was presented with the same real-world design challenge. They were tasked to create an inexpensive water pump for a developing country and, in one hour, provide two prototypes and a brief presentation.</p> <p>Jablokow’s team relied on three lenses for their analysis: Interaction Dynamics Notation (IDN) to depict communication patterns; the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory (KAI) to evaluate cognitive style; and design metrics to assess the overall outcomes from each team. With a better understanding of how individual cognitive characteristics and group dynamics influence I-Corps results, they hoped to determine the best teaching methods to meet the needs of each team.</p> <p>The result — a paper called “Exploring the Dynamic Interactions and Cognitive Characteristics of NSF Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Teams” — won second place for the best research paper in the entrepreneurship division of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) at its annual conference in June 2018.</p> <p>Megahed, an engineering management alumnus and current systems engineering student, started working with Jablokow shortly after she received the NSF grant in 2016. Pachute, an engineering management student, joined the team one year later. The two students worked on all aspects of the I-Corps study — analyzing interactions, team outcomes, individual perceptions, cognitive styles, and more. At times, the work was manual, especially when it came to IDN sequencing.</p> <p>Rather than concentrating purely on individual actions, IDN focuses on responses and shows the reciprocity of team interaction. Conversations during the workshop were recorded and later coded by hand, with each question, deflection, or moment of silence noted. While time consuming, it helped Jablokow’s team fully immerse themselves in the analysis.</p> <p>“It actually went quickly,” said Megahed. “It was never the same thing twice. The process wasn’t about technology, but rather the concepts behind the data. The time spent on it helped me better understand how these teams communicated.”</p> <p>Creating their own “war room” on campus in Jablokow’s Design Research Lab, Jablokow, Megahed and Pachpute met frequently, holding brainstorming sessions to discuss patterns and trends.</p> <p>Their study resulted in seven findings, including key takeaways for not only the I-Corps program, but also for engineering educators and teams in general. For example, Jablokow’s team found that “bridgers” — teammates whose cognitive styles place them between their more adaptive and more innovative collaborators — are key players in any engineering team. As observed during the I-Corps team interactions, they assume a social role and encourage others to contribute. If bridgers are present in other groups, it can facilitate discussion and prevent the groups from getting stuck in deliberations.</p> <p>In the past, the I-Corps teaching team has relied on three aspects for structuring their program: curriculum, pedagogy and learning environment, but Jablokow’s research discovered the potential for a fourth: team composition. Going forward, KAI can identify cognitive gaps between academic and entrepreneurial leads, and IDN can assess a mentor’s interactions and their effects on the team dynamics.</p> <p>For Megahed and Pachpute, the opportunity to work on this study was the perfect complement to the <a href="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/academics/masters-degrees/engineering-management?utm_source=penn_state_news&utm_medium=article&utm_campaign=penn_state_news&utm_content=student_asee_award" target="_blank">engineering management program</a>. Their analysis combined the technical aspects of an engineering degree, but also challenged their business and interpersonal skills. Working with real data — and real engineering teams — brought classroom concepts to life.</p> <p>“I see things differently now,” Megahed said. “Before, people would always talk over each other. It was tough to achieve things productively. But now, I can break people into smaller groups to accomplish specific tasks. We can better control our production.”</p> <p>“Examining these dynamics prepared me for a shift to a corporate environment,” added Pachpute. “As a marine engineer, I’ve been exposed to different team interactions. Most employees were contracted for six months, so there were a lot of comings and goings. As I move into an office setting, I’ll know how to leverage individual creative strengths and talents. It will make me a better manager.”</p> <p>The collaboration with Jablokow even helped Megahed land a new job. After bringing the award-winning paper to an interview, it was passed onto senior leadership. He received an offer shortly thereafter.</p> <p>“It really shows the value of the students’ work,” said Jablokow. “The project was funded by NSF and recognized by ASEE in a blind review. It’s a testament to the quality of their efforts and our findings.”</p> <p>Jablokow will continue to study nationwide engineering design teams, including teams from American Crane in Douglassville. Now, she’s grown her team from two research assistants to 10 — including students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. For Jablokow, the wide array of academic backgrounds and work experience is paramount.</p> <p>“In the engineering design field, cognitive diversity is so important,” she said. “Megahed and Pachpute brought two different perspectives to this study. Everyone has their own ideas and sees things in unique ways. Working together and collaborating — that’s what helps us examine the data from all points of view.”</p> </div> <p> </p> </div> Tue, 09 Oct 2018 14:04:00 +0000 admin 2744 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Invent Penn State Innovation Hubs map https://greatvalley.psu.edu/photo/1740/2017/06/08/invent-penn-state-innovation-hubs-map <span>Invent Penn State Innovation Hubs map</span> <div class="field field--name-field-credit field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Image: Penn State</div> <div class="field field--name-field-flickr-license-path field--type-link field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="http://flickr.com/photos/53130103@N05/34791787040/">Licensing and Use</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/sites/greatvalley/files/styles/photo_gallery_large/public/Invent%2520Penn%2520State_Innovation%2520Hub%2520Map_20170606%2520%25281%2529.png?itok=mTpQWHhs" width="800" height="622" alt="Map of 17 sites of Invent Penn State Innovation Hubs" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></div> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/08/2017 - 10:51</span> Thu, 08 Jun 2017 14:51:11 +0000 admin 1740 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Penn State Great Valley inaugurates REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship https://greatvalley.psu.edu/story/1709/2017/05/24/penn-state-great-valley-inaugurates-rev-center-entrepreneurship <span>Penn State Great Valley inaugurates REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship</span> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/24/2017 - 09:06</span> <span class="post-date">2017-05-24T12:50:00GMT</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MALVERN, Pa. — The Penn State Great Valley community celebrated its REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship on Monday, May 22, at a ribbon-cutting ceremony with Neil Sharkey, vice president for research at Penn State, Marybeth DiVincenzo, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of the Chester County Economic Development Council, and local dignitaries.</p> <p>Standing for Regional Entrepreneurial Ventures through University Programs, REV-UP aims to engage and encourage Penn State students, faculty and community members to generate innovative, commercially-viable solutions to address existing and emerging business and social needs, and to support their entrepreneurial efforts as they serve the Philadelphia region. The program will work closely with the Chester County Economic Development Council, its key corporate affiliate.</p> <p>The center was created last May thanks to a $50,000 seed grant from Invent Penn State, a Commonwealth-wide initiative that blends entrepreneurship-focused academic programs; business startup training and incubation; funding; and key regional partnerships together for the benefit of Pennsylvania and beyond.</p> <p>“Invent Penn State is President Barron’s initiative focused on leveraging Penn State’s research, knowledge and entrepreneurial spirit to bring to market needed ideas, products and services,” said James Nemes, chancellor and chief academic officer of Penn State Great Valley. “REV-UP is now one of 12 Innovation Hubs established across the Commonwealth and we’re honored to have been selected as one of them.”</p> <div data-embed-button="node" data-entity-embed-display="view_mode:node.embed" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="9438722f-b5c9-4b46-a045-072bd98688fe" data-langcode="en" class="embedded-entity"><div role="article" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/photo/1703/2017/05/24/rev-center-entrepreneurship" class="node image node-image embed clearfix"> <div class="content entity-embed"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/sites/greatvalley/files/styles/node_embed/public/170522-PSUGV-179.jpg?itok=w5LaJ_0u" width="700" height="467" alt="Marybeth DiVincenzo, Neil Sharkey, James Nemes, Nena Ellis Koschny, Doug Schumer, and Leo Daiuto, stand in front of the REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship." typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></div> <div class="group-info field-group-div"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Left to right: Marybeth DiVincenzo, Neil Sharkey, James Nemes, Nena Ellis Koschny, Doug Schumer, and Leo Daiuto, stand in front of the REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-credit field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Image: Melissa Kelly Photography</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="drupal-embed" embed_type="node" nid="1703" view_mode="embedded"></div> <p>Since its inception, REV-UP has helped launch a graduate certificate in new ventures and entrepreneurship; award the Warren V. Musser Fellowship in Entrepreneurial Studies to support a full-time graduate student interested in launching a business; hired an entrepreneur-in-residence to provide guidance to emerging entrepreneurs; and hosted an inaugural student-pitch day for scholars to share their ideas with faculty and area professionals.</p> <p>“The establishment of the REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship allows us not only to provide a world class graduate education, but also to become a crucial partner to further the economic development of our region in ways we never have been able to do before,” added Nemes.</p> <p>In addition to a welcome from Nemes, Monday’s event included remarks from Sharkey and DiVencenzo. Dennis Wozniak, engineering lab manager, provided guests with tours of the campus’ innovation center and makerspace, which includes state-of-the-art 3-D printers, machining centers, a laser engraver and other shop tools.</p> <p>This fall, REV-UP will hold its first-ever Lion Cage where area entrepreneurs will pitch their business ideas for cash prizes.</p> <p>More information on the REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship can be found at <a href="http://greatvalley.psu.edu/revup">greatvalley.psu.edu/revup</a>.</p> </div> Wed, 24 May 2017 13:06:57 +0000 admin 1709 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Great Valley to hold inaugural Student Pitch Day on April 27 https://greatvalley.psu.edu/story/1339/2017/04/06/great-valley-hold-inaugural-student-pitch-day-april-27 <span>Great Valley to hold inaugural Student Pitch Day on April 27</span> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Thu, 04/06/2017 - 10:31</span> <span class="post-date">2017-04-06T14:07:00GMT</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MALVERN, Pa. — Students can pitch their business ideas and compete for cash prizes at Penn State Great Valley’s inaugural Student Pitch Day on April 27. Sponsored by the REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship, this is an excellent opportunity for students to share their entrepreneurial visions with faculty and area professionals.</p> <p>Running from 1 to 6 p.m., the event will consist of two rounds of pitches, a keynote address, guest speakers, and a panel discussion beneficial to early-stage startup founders. Awards will be given to the top three pitches, including a $500 cash prize for first place.</p> <p>“The REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship is committed to supporting student success and the ecosystem of local entrepreneurs,” said Doug Schumer, the faculty director for the center. “Student Pitch Day is great opportunity for students to gain experience in presenting their company concept, and we look forward to making this an annual event.”</p> <p>Individuals interested in sharing their idea should complete the Student Pitch Day Application Form found on the <a href="http://greatvalley.psu.edu/student-pitch-day" target="_blank">Penn State Great Valley website</a> by Thursday, April 13. Students will be judged on their presentation skills and the attractiveness of their investment opportunity.</p> <p>Established by a grant through the Invent Penn State initiative, the REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship aims to engage and encourage Penn State students, faculty and community members to generate innovative, commercially-viable solutions to address existing and emerging business and social needs. The center has also partnered with the Chester County Economic Development Council to support entrepreneurial efforts throughout the Philadelphia region.</p> </div> Thu, 06 Apr 2017 14:31:01 +0000 admin 1339 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Great Valley to launch graduate certificate in entrepreneurship this spring https://greatvalley.psu.edu/story/918/2017/01/16/great-valley-launch-graduate-certificate-entrepreneurship-spring <span>Great Valley to launch graduate certificate in entrepreneurship this spring</span> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Mon, 01/16/2017 - 11:26</span> <span class="post-date">2017-01-16T17:35:33GMT</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MALVERN, Pa. — Penn State Great Valley will offer a new graduate certificate this spring for current and aspiring entrepreneurs to conceptualize and develop new business endeavors.</p> <p>The 12-credit New Ventures and Entrepreneurship graduate certificate program will engage students in a creative process that will include opportunity recognition, idea generation and selection, the lean startup process, and business plan development. Using a multidisciplinary approach, students will learn how to write all sections of a professional business plan, including the presentation of financial statements and market data. They will also have an opportunity to pitch their new ventures or products to potential investors.</p> <p>“We’re very excited to offer this new certificate that will give students a unique combination of skills in business and creative problem-solving as they develop new ventures and products,” said Kathryn Jablokow, one of the faculty members leading the certificate.</p> <p>This new certificate comes on the heels of a $50,000 seed grant from the Invent Penn State initiative to expand entrepreneurial endeavors at Penn State Great Valley. The grant established the campus’ REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship, a program operating in partnership with the Chester County Economic Development Council aimed to engage and encourage students, faculty, and community members to generate innovative solutions to address existing and emerging business and social needs.</p> <p>Interested individuals should apply for Spring II admission by Tuesday, Feb. 28, in order to begin courses in March. Current Penn State Great Valley graduate students in all programs are also welcome to apply and enroll in this certificate. More information on the New Ventures and Entrepreneurship graduate certificate can be found on the <a href="http://greatvalley.psu.edu/academics/graduate-certificates/new-ventures-and-entrepreneurship" target="_blank">Penn State Great Valley website</a>.</p> </div> Mon, 16 Jan 2017 16:26:11 +0000 admin 918 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Happy Valley LaunchBox https://greatvalley.psu.edu/photo/775/2016/06/14/happy-valley-launchbox <span>Happy Valley LaunchBox</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Entrepreneurs make use of the Happy Valley LaunchBox on June 7, 2016, part of the Invent Penn State Initiative. Located in downtown State College, the Happy Valley LaunchBox features co-working space for entrepreneurs, including large monitors users can hook their laptops to, as well as fast internet connections.</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-credit field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Image: Curtis Chan</div> <div class="field field--name-field-flickr-license-path field--type-link field--label-hidden field--item"><a href="http://flickr.com/photos/53130103@N05/27061661873/">Licensing and Use</a></div> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/sites/greatvalley/files/styles/photo_gallery_large/public/Happy%2520Valley%2520LaunchBox.jpg?itok=DOFkINOI" width="800" height="563" alt="Room of users on computers" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></div> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/14/2016 - 13:51</span> Tue, 14 Jun 2016 17:51:51 +0000 admin 775 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu Local entrepreneur hired to support REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship https://greatvalley.psu.edu/story/738/2016/11/29/local-entrepreneur-hired-support-rev-center-entrepreneurship <span>Local entrepreneur hired to support REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship</span> <span><span lang="" about="https://greatvalley.psu.edu/users/admin" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">admin</span></span> <span>Tue, 11/29/2016 - 13:46</span> <span class="post-date">2016-11-29T20:22:18GMT</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>MALVERN, Pa. — Penn State Great Valley welcomes Leo Daiuto as the campus’ part-time entrepreneur-in-residence. In addition to starting two technology-based businesses, he formed and grew a user experience-focused group at Unisys. As the entrepreneur-in-residence, Daiuto will support the campus’ REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship and mentor and assist students interested in starting a businesses.</p> <p>With a background in computer science, Daiuto started his career at Unisys as a summer intern. Over the course of 20 years, he worked his way up the career ladder to ultimately build and direct the company’s Human Factors and Design Group. Concentrating on user interface and the physical design, his team’s approach shed a new perspective on the company’s technology. He grew the group from an initial 11 Pennsylvania-based employees to 140 across the world.</p> <p>“My experience there inspired me to create new things and build teams,” he added. “I hired a core group of people — some of whom I still work with today. If you construct the right team of people, they can thrive in a variety of industries and situations.”</p> <p>In 2005 he turned one of his ideas into reality. Daiuto and his brother, a Penn State graduate, founded Slamm, a creative agency providing digital solutions in application development, user experience, and branding. The company built a variety of platforms, including a home control platform that contributed to their acquisition by Evolve Controls. After the merge, Daiuto continued his involvement to provide guidance on product development and overall strategy as the senior vice president of user experience and chief experience officer.</p> <p>Embarking on another entrepreneurial endeavor, he and his brother started the West Chester-based Revolt Group in 2013. More technology-based than Slamm, the company builds and provides cloud-based solutions to other organizations. Daiuto sits on the group’s board today.</p> <p>Daiuto heard about the entrepreneur-in-residence position from fellow entrepreneur and current board member Anthony Gold. Already familiar with both the Great Valley campus and the Penn State brand (in addition to his brother being a Penn State alumnus, his father served on Great Valley’s Advisory Board), Daiuto is eager to get started with REV-UP.</p> <p>“I enjoy working with passionate people to help foster their ideas,” he remarked. “I love the concept of REV-UP. I’m excited to harness the power of the Penn State brand to create a hub of corporate sponsors, investors, students, alumni, and entrepreneurs in this community.”</p> <p>In addition to his work with Penn State Great Valley, Daiuto actively consults with startups and established businesses to help them grow, hire effective teams, and build successful products. Although the entrepreneur-in-residence position is part-time, he has already met with key stakeholders to discuss future initiatives for REV-UP, including the Lion Cage competition set for 2017.</p> <p>“With Great Valley’s location in Malvern, we can provide a different appeal from the city. The REV-UP Center for Entrepreneurship will offer something different, and I think we can help local entrepreneurs launch their ideas.”</p> </div> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 18:46:53 +0000 admin 738 at https://greatvalley.psu.edu